Cutting Through The Crap

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

Change


Because the first of his appointments include several from the Clinton era, Barack Obama is being criticized by some as reneging on his "change" agenda. I disagree.

Emanuel, Podesta, Craig, Holder, maybe Hillary. Several others. As far as I know, these are strong and capable people. What it says to me is that he wants people in place who have been there; that he wants to avoid having to bring staff up to speed, wants to get off to a running start. It's less about where they've been than it is about what they will do. And whereas that remains to be seen, I find no reason to think it will be business as usual. I'm glad he's not starting with neophytes. I'm happy to see some old hands, experienced in dealing with Congress, knowing their way around the White House. I draw no premature conclusions about policy and productivity, other than to see evidence of seriousness of purpose.

One would predict, based on what he's said many times, that there will be great changes in how business is done: there will be inclusiveness, thoughtfulness, carefulness, openness, non-ideological. That's the kind of change he promised and which we expect. And until we have a look at these people in action in an Obama administration, claims to the contrary are premature, and silly.

4 comments:

tom said...

The best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. I am concerned that the behaviors that Obama says he believes in and values are not the behaviors that advanced the careers of Mr. Emanuel or Mrs. Clinton. Can a town steeped in intrigue, power and misdirection be changed by one man? Time will tell

tom said...

The best predictor of future behavior is past behavior. I am concerned that the behaviors that Obama says he believes in and values are not the behaviors that advanced the careers of Mr. Emanuel or Mrs. Clinton. Can a town steeped in intrigue, power and misdirection be changed by one man? Time will tell

Sid Schwab said...

yeah, it's not as if there's no concern here. Still, at least with Emanuel, it seems his reputation for hyperpartisanship may be over stated; what I read suggests a pragmatist looking for ways to get things done. He has admirers on the right. Some, anyway. As to the Clintons, who the hell knows? I lost a lot of respect during the campaign, but I'm giving the benefit of doubt for now.

MedZag said...

Having a sitdown with Senator McCain so recently after the election? Urging democratic senate leaders to let bygones be bygones and let Lieberman keep his post? Talk of keeping on Bob Gates as SECDEF and bringing in Hagel on his cabinet? Talking about reading Lincoln's writings on his strategy of a bipartisan cabinet. That sort of bipartisanship is 'change' I can certainly believe in.