Cutting Through The Crap

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Perception


Perception. Funny how it works.

I read a lengthy article in Politico about problems within the Romney campaign, placing most of the blame for his problems on a guy named Stevens, his campaign manager. As I read it, I saw it as a way of paving the way for changing the subject if The Rominee loses: it's not about message, it's about mistakes his staff made. In other words, Republicans can say, the people didn't reject our mantra of lower taxes, deregulation, and saber rattling. That Mormon guy just ran a lousy campaign. Which, to me, misses the point entirely: the reason Romney is (at the moment) losing is that people are starting to recognize what he'd do as president. It's not the messaging: it's the message. And the messenger.

Then I read some of the comments. (Before doing so on any right-wing source, it's best to have the shower warmed up and ready.) To them, it was a typical left-wing screed, designed to take down their candidate.

Now, to me, Politico's main writers have said some of the dumber things about Obama I've seen, from a non-certifiable RWS™. And if the preceding links aren't as convincing as other stuff I've read but haven't located just yet, it's noteworthy that two of them were used on right-wing sites. So, at best, Politico, in managing to annoy both sides at times, isn't as clearly one way or the other as Fox or MSNBC. But, as Romney keeps stumbling, wingnuts would have you believe otherwise of it, or any source that points out Mitt's mendacity.

But it is the message: check out this list of tweets by David Frum, former adviser and speech writer for GWBush. Pay particular attention to #10. Should be on bumper stickers.

My point, unoriginal as it may be, is simply that people bring their own looking-glasses to anything they see, and find in it what they want. That it applies to politics is unsurprising; although to the extent that it shows how little common ground remains on US soil, it is pretty dispiriting. And my perception is that the perception problem is stronger on the right. If I'm wrong, does it matter?

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